Psaki REFUSES to Tell Doocy Whether Biden Thinks Far-Left DA’s Are Causing Mass Crime




On Monday’s abridged publication of The Psaki Show, Fox’s Peter Doocy came planned( as always) with tough questions many of his colleagues refuse to ask, focusing this day on issues pertaining to the cost of the Biden administration’s Build Back Better( BBB) boondoggle, whether Vice President Harris is still in charge of combatting illegal immigration, and the role of liberal lawyers contributing to rising crime.

Doocy produced with BBB and whether President Biden would support the bill’s host of new social programs being “made permanent” despite the fact that, as per a brand-new orchestrate from the Congressional Budget Office( CBO) in which “they assume that social programs are going to be made permanent and, in all such cases, it would lend nearly$ 3 trillion.”

Psaki roundly rejected it, repeatedly calling it “a forge CBO score” since it’s “not based on the actual bill” led by an invite of the CBO by Senator Lindsey Graham( R-SC)( whom Psaki first referred to as a woman in a Freudian slip ).

Doocy moved to immigration and striking explains made by the chairman of Guatemala last week to his colleague John Roberts( click “expand”)

DOOCY: Is Vice President Harris still in charge of addressing the root causes from migration from El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala?

PSAKI: She is and I merely announced a commitment that she’s announcing this afternoon.

DOOCY: So then why hasn’t she spoken to the president of Guatemala since June? That’s six months.

PSAKI: Well, I know that — I did this kind of strange report from the president of Guatemala, saying that he’s had no contact with the White House, which is inaccurate.

DOOCY: No. He didn’t say the White House. He said Vice President Harris. He has not been talking to her and if she’s in charge, why — why is that?

PSAKI: Well, we have had a range of communications, Peter. I think that’s reflected in the readout last week with our national security advisor, with the Vice President’s national defence advisor, with our NSC senior chairman Juan Gonzales. We put under an substantial readout of that just last week and we’ll continue that high level of engagement.

Closing with the terrifying issue of rising crime and smash-and-grab crimes, Doocy posed to Psaki a basic question: “Do you think it’s possible that big cities are dealing with these smash and grab frauds right now, an increase in criminal activity because some lawyers are too soft on crime? ”

Psaki told me that she wouldn’t “attribute the reasoning from here, ” but she did the opposite as, before talking about the White House’s places great importance on “ensuring local police departments and policeman have the funding they need, ” she accused the coronavirus as “we have seen an increase of crime over the course of the pandemic.”

Doocy followed up by blowing punctures in this argument: “[ W] hat good does it do if you’re going to give police districts extra money if they arrest bad chaps and they generating them to jail and then they’re not prosecuted. They’re just right back out on the streets.”

After she doubled down on her previous reaction, Doocy questioned whether Biden believes it’s “good governing” for those trot New York City to have contingencies like “pickpocket[ er] with more than 30 arrests” and the believe in the burning of the $500,000 Fox Christmas tree both being allowed “back out on the streets.”

Psaki missed nothing to do with this, territory she already had “spoke to the President’s concerns about retail theft.”

At the other end of the questioning spectrum, The Washington Post’s Sean Sullivan devoted Psaki two opportunities from the left to rule that the hurricanes that razed Kentucky and other Midwestern states last week came as a result of man-made climate change impacts( click “expand” ):

The President has had to address a series of natural disasters, other severe forecast presences this year from wildfire to hurricanes and now these squalls and each time, we’ve heard time talk about how, I think he said this on Saturday, that these are not partisan times, we’re not, you are well aware, Republicans and Democrat, but we’ve also heard — also him on many occasions talk about the demonstrative effect of climate change …[ W] hat, if something, can we expect to hear from the president when he goes to Kentucky on Wednesday about — exclusively about climate change impacts and can you talk about how he offsets those two imperatives of trying to strike this unifying memorandum, but talking about an issue that, you know, frankly, is a partisan — that has caused a partisan divide?

(….)

[ T] he President, I recall, said on Saturday that he would seek some input from the EPA about whether these specific tornadoes were caused by climate change, how much of a direct secure there was there. Has he got feedback from them and, if so, what have they informed him about the phenomenon?

To realise the relevant transcript from December 13 ’s briefing, click “expand.”

White House press briefing( via CBSN) December 13, 2021 1:09:25 p.m. Eastern

PETER DOOCY: You’re not going to believe this. I have another question about Build Back Better.

JEN PSAKI: I am ready.

DOOCY: So, the President says Build Back Better is not going to add a penny to the deficit. The CBO has this new score where they assume that social programs are going to be made permanent and, in all such cases, it would contribute nearly$ 3 trillion. So, does that mean that President Biden will commit that these programs are not going to be made permanent?

PSAKI: Well, first of all, what we’re talking about is a fake CBO score that is not based on the actual bill that anyone is voting on. This was an ask — request by Senator Graham to score a statute that is not currently being debated. That is her — his prerogative to do, but what our focus is on is on the existing bill that will lower the deficit, that are able to also, over an additional 10 times, pay for the$ 2 trillion excise pieces that Republicans didn’t pay for. They’re welcome for that, so I would say, Peter, to your question, the President has shown very clear — multiple times publicly, that he wishes to planneds, if they’re diversified, to be paid for. That remains his commitment, but it’s important to understand when you — when anybody conjures a question about this new CBO score, it is a fake score about a greenback that doesn’t exist and we should really focus on the actual bill everybody’s going to vote on and consider in Congress right now.

DOOCY: Okay. Another topic: Is Vice President Harris still in charge of addressing the root causes from movement from El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala?

PSAKI: She is and I exactly announced a commitment that she’s announcing this afternoon.

DOOCY: So then why hasn’t she spoken to the President of Guatemala since June? That’s six months.

PSAKI: Well, I know that — I did this kind of strange report from the President of Guatemala, saying that he’s had no contact with the White House, which is inaccurate.

DOOCY: No. He didn’t say the White House. He said Vice President Harris. He had not been able to been talking to her and if she’s in charge, why — why is that?

PSAKI: Well, we have had a range of discussions, Peter. I think that’s reflected in the readout last week with our national security advisor, with the Vice President’s national security advisor, with our NSC major chairman Juan Gonzales. We bring out an thorough readout of that only last week and we’ll continue that high level of commitment.

DOOCY: Okay. Final topic: Do you think it’s possible that big cities are dealing with these smash and grab crimes right now, an increase in criminal activity because some lawyers are too soft on crime?

PSAKI: I would say “were having” seen — I am not going to attribute the reasoning from here. What I will tell you is “were having” seen an increase of crime over the course of the pandemic. There are a range of reasons for that and what we’re — our focus is on is what we can do to address it. The President proposed additional funding to insure local police departments and policemen have the funding they need. We have been previously made directly with police agencies in areas where they are seeing the highest impact of the crime, the retail crime, which we have great concern about. That is what our focus is on, currently, is action and doing what we can to make sure the funding is out there to the communities that need it the most.

DOOCY: But I guess what good does it do if you’re going to give police districts extra money if they arrest bad chaps and they creating them to jail and then they’re not prosecuted. They’re just right back out on the street.

PSAKI: I picture, Peter, what our focus is on is making sure that the local leaders, the police officers and departments who know what they need for these communities have the help and the funding they need and that’s what we’re working around the clock on.

DOOCY: So, so the final one would be, precisely in the last week, we insured a New York Post item about a pickpocket with more than 30 arrests back out on the street. We’ve seen an arsonist burn down a half million dollar Christmas tree in New York City, back out on the streets. Does the President think that that’s good control?

PSAKI: Again, I reflect I’ve spoken to the President’s concerns about retail theft. If you have specific — and in the actions we’ve taken — for particular case, I would point to the local police departments or the Department of Justice.

(….)

1:20: 27 p.m. 3 minutes and 10 seconds

SEAN SULLIVAN: The President has had to address a series of natural disasters, other severe weather existences this year —

PSAKI: Yeah.




SULLIVAN: — from wildfire to hurricanes and now these tornadoes and each time, we’ve heard time talk about how, I think he said this on Saturday, that these are not partisan instants, we’re not, you know, Republicans and Democrats, but we’ve also heard — also him on many occasions talk about the demonstrative effect of climate change. So, two questions. One, what, if anything, can we expect to hear from the President when he goes to Kentucky on Wednesday about — precisely about climate change impacts and can you talk about how he matches those two responsibilities of trying to strike this unifying note, but talking about an issue that, you are well aware, frankly, is a partisan — that has caused a partisan divide?

PSAKI: You’re right. I — I’m not going to get ahead of what he’s going to say in Kentucky and, as I noted in response to Kelly’s question, I want, that visit is really about him receiving an update of the make that’s happening on the dirt, hearing immediately from leaders on what they need more from the federal government departments, if anything, and he’s going to be very responsive to that and really trying to be a source of consolation to people who have been through a devastating couple of daylights in their own communities. So, it’s not an opportunity — he’s not going to give a major pronunciation while he’s there. I is important to note, and he’s been asked this a couple of times over the past few dates and “when hes” — when he was in the northeast several months ago, what has striking to him and to all of us is just the impact of the environment — the changing nature of the climate and the crisis that is the climate currently on — on communities across the country, on the cost to communities, on these major weather events that have impacted such a proliferating percentage of –[ PHONE GOES OFF] — oh, oh, okay. We’re getting a little groovy in now, I like it. Okay.

REPORTER: My bad.

PSAKI: It’s kind of exactly what we needed right now. It’s all good. Yeah. I was enjoying it fully. We should turn it back on in a few minutes. Anyway, there are some truly startling statistics. I are really get these — all — out to all of you about the percentage of people in the country who have impacted by severe weather events. It has increased over the course of time and the President will talk about this more. And it is not a political thing because look at the communities that ought to have affected: red, blue, violet , no color at all, communities that don’t consider themselves political in any way, appearance, or pattern and this is certainly a driving reason why we need to do more to address the climate crisis, but let me get back to you with those statistics, which I envisage have really struck the President as the reason why we need to act.

SULLIVAN: Along the same lines, the President, I feel, said on sunday that he would seek some input from the EPA about whether these specific tornadoes were caused by climate change, how much of a direct necktie there was there. Has he got feedback from them and, if so, what have they informed him about the phenomenon?

PSAKI: I think he only answered a similar question this morning as well and it is something that he’ll only continue to discuss with his environment advisers and teams and, obviously, local leaders as well. But I don’t think there’s any new assessment of it. He just knows that because of the change in climate, because of the threat the atmosphere crisis constitutes that we’re — we have seen more extreme weather events and that is a reason to act.

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