Reigning Chaos




Globally realise trendspotter Marian Salzman recently returned to the BlogHer stage to share her highly envisioned projections for 2022. As part of our supporting editorial, we requested belief leaders from the BlogHer Community to share their perspectives on what’s in store for us in the course of the year.

Tania Yuki is Founder and CEO of Shareablee. Shareablee was founded in February 2013 when Tania viewed a new territory rising across social media. She was convinced that social data would profoundly reform how companionships communicate and do business and dedicated herself to understanding what becomes social material succeed. Since then, Shareablee has become the world’s largest organization of firebrand carry-on data across social stages.

2022 trends

Marian Salzman joined us live on December 14 th for an insightful conference about the 22 for 2022. Watch the replay live above.

I. Love. Chaos. I affection chaos. I admire the goo of it, the frenetic, vibrating intensity, the pulse, the freedom of the media, the unruliness. I adore how chaos chews process and established rules for breakfast. As Mike Tyson formerly said: “Everyone “ve got a plan” until they get punched in the mouth”, and when that time arrives, you require- no, it is necessary to- members of the public who find the inevitable chaos recreation, who are galvanized by challenges beyond their hold. As young adults, though I “ve learned” the trappings of establishing up zen in my professional life, I’m still in my heart and by instinct, a chaos machine.

Chaos is not for everyone. In her recent report 22 For 22, Global Trendspotter Marian Salzman explains that the complexity of the future will require most to adopt some “mental jujitsu” that reframes chaos into something that feels controllable, nonetheless illusory that button is likely to be. For me, the direction that I restrain chaos is by adopting it. So the unclear state of the world and the future, the uncertainty of pretty much everything that has been catalyzed by the pandemic, by lockdown, running from home, and more … hasn’t much inconvenienced me. I’ve been jolly comfortable being unpleasant. Until now.

So what altered?

The chaos has continued rising, but there’s been nowhere to articulate it. It’s seeping in through the fissures everywhere and even the most diehard chaos mongers are struggling to stay afloat. On social media so far in 2021, there have been over two hundred million engagements with content mentioning “chaos” in the United States alone- up twenty-six percentage versus 2020, the year of chaos, and up more than one hundred percent from 2019.

Chaos has become so overtaking that it has started conflicting with the main principles of being human, and that is creating a new breaking point- a brand-new intricacy if you are able to, that can’t be solved simply by guiding faster.

Being human right now necessitates having to slow down and sit still. Like it or not, there is literally nowhere to go, sometimes for daylights, weeks on end. Stillness has been thrust on all of us, willfully or not. Hyperlocalism has transcended our proximate physical room, and a part of “staying local”, is being forced to look inward, very. The only target left to go is to the stuff that’s closest to home, that perhaps one has most wanted to avoid by staying in motion. And no matter how much one tries to drown it out with perpetual TV registers, social media, and recreation, it’s always there, waiting.

The more I removed from being “in” the world, surfing that erratic brandish, the more I recognized how much of all that motion, that tumultuous adrenalin, that stress and sustain, was just theater. And not interesting theater, at that. Unproductive, debilitating, improvisational theater. The scooting to move airliners go nowhere important, to hasten to intersects that could have been handled remotely or bounced absolutely, the crucial seven am breakfast meets that nobody ever wanted to go to in the history of business- could all simply be deleted. Yes, even the “two hours each room commute from Connecticut”, is not mandatory to be successful, because it turns out you can type and talk just fine from home.

I don’t think we can un-ring this bell as national societies, and I sincerely hope we don’t try. But it does beg the question- if the past eighteen months have stripped apart so much better of what kept me in motion, what am I leave behind? And how do I fill the divergences? Candidly, I’m not sure yet.

I only know a few things. I am not just my abilities. I am not just my ability to thrive in chaos. And right now, despite what I might feel or what my calendar might tell me, I have nowhere to be. I have not yet been crisis to solve , no aircraft to catch. I am not letting anyone down really by pausing. Good-for-nothing will undermine, stop or stop being. So there is no reason why I can’t simply be in this moment.




And that, perhaps, is enough to keep the chaos at bay for now.

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