Dalelorenzo's GDI Blog
9May/210

Despite right-wing panic about the plummeting birthrate, Republicans are lining up against Biden’s pro-family ‘human infrastructure’ push

President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney greet babies on the campaign trail in 2012. President Barack Obama and Republican presidential campaigner Mitt Romney greet children on the campaign trail in 2012.

Many on the right, particularly social and religious conservatives, are concerned about the US's worsening birthrate. Meanwhile, liberals are hoping to pass a transformational expansion of the social safety net that they are able to make it easier for many Americans to have teenagers. But Republicans appear dead set against Democratic proposals for paid category leave and universal childcare. See more tales on Insider's business sheet.

Welcome to the pandemic baby bust.

As countless Americans spotcheck themselves captured at home over the last year, some speculated the US would envision a "baby boom." Instead, the public health emergency and economic crisis led to a breakdown in the number of deliveries. Experts foresee there will be about 300,000 fewer children born in the US in 2021 than there were last year.

But the abrupt descend builds on a longer-term trend. US birthrate multitudes plummeted following the 2008 financial crisis and has continued to fall over the last dozen times, even as the economy recovered. In 2019, they reached their lowest level in 35 times.

Some reactionaries are panicking about the declining birthrate and the impact it could have on conservative importances and the economy. Progressives are largely less concerned with the number of deliveries, and more focused on pulling children and their parents out of poverty and forming it easier for families to raise the kids they have.

After passing a temporary, but substantial, expansion of the child excise ascribe designed to halve child privation, President Joe Biden is getting ready to unveil another far-reaching set of proposals that would hugely expand the social safety net for categories. Among those policies are universal pre-K and paid home leave, both of which are proven to boost women's jobs and the birthrate.

But while these policies would make it easier for Americans to have teenagers, Republican lawmakers are dead set against the American Families Plan.

baby

' Bad times planned precipitate birthrates'

To some extent, the birthrate decline wonders advances in gender equity. As gals access more educational and employment opportunities, they often postpone marriage and have fewer children. Increased access to long-acting reversible contraception is also helping people, including teens, shunned unintended pregnancy.

But economic hardship and uncertainty are perhaps the most important factors. When unemployment rises or incomes come, people have fewer children. Millennials are specially hard-hit by sky-rocketing healthcare and housing penalties, and the debt crisis. Their generation masteries less than 5% of the nation's wealth, while baby boomers held 21% of the country's abundance at the same age.

As a ensue, countless younger Americans say they can't afford to have as countless minors as they'd are happy to. This has helped create a gap between the number of children Americans say they miss, and the count we are really have, known as unmet fertility.

More than 60% of Americans between 20 and 40 who are having fewer children than they'd like to cite the high cost of childcare, according to a 2018 New York Times survey. About half said they were worried about the economy and 44% said they just couldn't yield to have any kids, or more kids than they already have.

"Throughout history, bad times mean fall birthrates, " Philip Cohen, a sociologist and demographer at the University of Maryland, told Insider. He added that as a result of COVID-1 9, "a lot of beings suffered a lot, a lot of beings had drastic changes in their lives, and we see it now in the data -- they're only not having as many children."

The US isn't alone: Most advanced economies are experiencing a similar long-term birthrate lessen obligated more severe by the pandemic. Almost a third of American women and gender non-conforming people say they're delaying having boys or won't have a kid because of the pandemic, distributed according to a Modern Fertility survey.

Lower-income genealogies and communities of color have been disproportionately affected by COVID-1 9 illness and fatalities, unemployment, and other economic hardship. At the same time, higher-income Americans who've restrain their jobs and wreaked remotely through the pandemic have seen their savings balloon. Professionals conclude the growing popularity of white collar remote work might foster higher-income families to have more children in the long-term.

"It would not surprise me at all, a year from now when we get better data, if the birth effect was bigger on lower socio-economic status wives, " Phillip Levine, an economics prof at Wellesley College and a co-author of a Brookings Institution study predicting a 2021 birthrate deterioration, told Insider.

When it comes to boosting birthrates, professionals say it will require policies that promote long-term economic stability and major investments in social plan, rather than just short-term doses of money.

"Things like healthcare and education and living ... that would meet the future more secure, especially for parties at the lower aim, those are the pressing matters both whether you're trying to increase the birthrate or whether you're trying to obligate lifetime better, " said Cohen, the UMD sociologist.

tucker carlson ups package Tucker Carlson

Why some are concerned about the birthrate

Who cares if Americans are having fewer babies?

Many economists is forecast that a developing elderly persons will damage Social Security and otherwise overburden a shrink labor-force. Some, including a large number of social conservatives, trust a coming birthrate will exacerbate social lonelines on the individual level, doom American fiscal and political superpower on a world scale, and undercut republican house principles. Others, including liberal journalist Matthew Yglesias , wants to see the US population grow to counteract China's international force.

More worryingly, political scientists alarm that civilizations with rejecting birthrates are more likely to embrace right-wing populism, nationalism, and xenophobia.

Ethnocentrism and white supremacy has all along been fueled horrors about demographic deepen. White nationalist political groups, from the Nazis to Hungary's current finding gathering, have pressured wives to have larger households.

In the US, the far-right promotes the white supremacist "Great Replacement" theory, which holds that people of color will supersede white people as the birthrate among lily-white ladies drops-off.

Fox News host Tucker Carlson, one of the most influential express on the political liberty, argues that America needs more children but fewer immigrants. He endorses the "replacement theory, " bemoans the country's changing racial demographics, demonizes poor immigrants, and advocates young Americans to have gigantic class and resurrect a patriarchal social organization.

Former Rep. Steve King, an Iowa Republican and white supremacist sympathizer, declared in 2017 that "we can't recover our civilisation with somebody else's babies."

Welcoming more immigrants into the country is the fastest way to quickly grow the US labor force, and economists say higher levels of immigration are badly needed to maintain economic emergence. New York City's main demographer recently said the "real threat" facing the city post-pandemic "is that we stop draw immigrants." But as thousands of migrant children are detained on the US-Mexico border, most Republican endorsement restrictionist immigration policies and mass deportation.

The US also has a long history of lowering Black, chocolate-brown, and poor mothers. Social refuge curricula with work requirements force poor single fathers into the workforce, even as conservatives advise higher-income wives to stay home. Many conservatives, including Carlson, who express concern about the descending birthrate don't approval particular social welfare policies that would make it easier for lower-income kinfolks, who are disproportionately Black and chocolate-brown, to have children.

"If it was just about the birthrate and it was just about American females having more children and there weren't other strata there with respect to racism and poverty, we are to be able watch a very different approach in some of these different policy arenas, " Jamila Michener, a government professor at Cornell University and co-director of its Center for Health Equity, told Insider.

Democratic Congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez poses with a child in costume as she attends the Democratic Congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez constitutes with small children in attire as she attends the "Halloween with Alexandria" event at St Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church in the Bronx, New York, U.S ., October 31, 2018.

The' moral predicament' of boosting birthrates

Progressives generally agreed to accept republicans that unmet birthrate is problematic, but they are more concerned with the underlying social afflictions it manifests. They believe growing inequality, long-lasting child poverty, and climate change are more pressing problems than the birthrate decline.

Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez recently argued that it's a "luxury" for countless Americans to feel financially stable enough to have girls.

"The actual crisis is how entire generations are plummet[ with] inhumane levels of student debt, low incomes, high hire , no guarantee of healthcare& little action on climate change which creates a situation where feeling stable enough to have a kid can feel more like a comfort than a norm, " she tweeted in answer to a legend about the newborn failure "crisis."

There's also growing concern, particularly among young people, about the atmosphere impacts and referred ethical implications of having children. Research has shown that having one fewer child is the single most impactful behavioral war anyone can take to reduce their carbon footprint - and Americans emanate among the most carbon per person of any country in the world. Prince Harry recently told Jane Goodall that he and his wife would have no more than two children, in part because of their concern for the planet's future.

"Bringing more beings into a context of spectacular difference where there is no guarantee that they will be take better care or that they will have a viable environment to exist in - I think there is a real moral predicament there, " Michener said.

The politics of pro-family policies

Both Republicans and Democrats demand they're "pro-family, " but American public policy is notoriously unfriendly to most kinfolks and children. Unlike other major economies, the US doesn't have subsidized child-care, paid parental leave, universal healthcare, or other key programs that improve promoted girls and lineages out of poverty and improve the middle class.

Except for a few years during WWII when women temporarily assembled the workforce en masse, the US has never had universal child-care. In most US governments, child-care now costs more than in-state college tuition. Daycare and preschool expenses are sending some American households into debt.

No Republican lawmakers voted in favour of Biden's stimulus parcel, but some social conservatives have come around to the idea of transporting cash to mothers. In February, GOP Sen. Mitt Romney proposed his Family Security Act, which includes an even more generous child allowance than the one Biden indicated into statute. Boosters of the scheme say it is contributing to stay-at-home parenting and union, reduce the abortion charge by ship fund to pregnant women, and improve the birthrate.

The Biden administration is looking to significantly expand the safety net for families in its next "Build Back Better" legislative pushing. The director has proposed another $25 billion be invested in the country's child-care centers - following a $25 billion bailout in the March stimulus - and a universal pre-K program. The American Families Plan, which the administration has said it will unveil later this month, will also include paid family and medical leave, expand the Affordable Care Act, and extend the child allowance passed in the stimulus. Research has found that government-funded child-care it's one of the best ways to boost the birthrate through policy.

The Democratic push for these family-supporting plans comes after decades of progressive activism.

Former Vice President Joe Biden (L) and Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren arrive on stage for the fourth Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat, has been collecting alarm systems about the smash costs of childrearing for two decades.

"Bringing up children has indeed become a crummy financial bargain, " Warren wrote in her 2003 book, "The Two-Income Trap: Why Middle-Class Parents Are Going Broke." "Some maidens help find[ the] mixture: Don't have children."

She quarrelled back then that women's entering into the labor-force hadn't contributed significantly to a correspond monetary increase for dual-income households, in part because of the rapidly increasing costs of child-care, education, and house. In recent years, social republicans have resurfaced "The Two-Income Trap" and argued that its findings support their case for more stay-at-home mothers. Warren counters that the evidence reveals fathers need more family-friendly policies to support them.

Over the last 20 times, the fiscal stress on families has "only gotten worse, " Warren told Insider recently.

"When countries don't support families and genealogies are under greater stress, there's a lot of fallout, including the changing nature of birthrates, " she said.

Warren and other 2020 Democratic presidential candidates flowed on far-reaching pro-family programs, including universal child-care, paid category leave, and "baby bonds."

"Universal child-care is another form of infrastructure. We build superhighways and connects so that people can go to work, " Warren told Insider. "If we want parents to be able to go to work, then they need child-care. Opposition to universal child-care is opposition to reaching our economy work for everyone, both parents and non-parents."

But it's going to be challenging to convince any Republican lawmakers to support Biden's American Families Plan.

Traditional financial conservatives quarrel the policy is too expensive and is contributing to single parenthood and dependency on government curricula. Social republicans defend the policy in part because it benefits class with two working parents more than those with a stay-at-home parent. Universal child-care has been proven to significantly boost women's occupation, which erodes conservative efforts to encourage stay-at-home parenting.

President Richard Nixon vetoed a bipartisan government-funded child-care policy in 1971, quoting "fiscal irresponsibility" and the "family-weakening implications" of supporting mothers in the workforce. But some republican lawmakers supporting a form of government subsidized paid leave. The Trump administration, with Democratic corroborate, extended paid house leave to most federal employees last year.

Lyman Stone, an adjunct fellow at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, says the birthrate decline is a "crisis" that can only be solved with a batch of pro-natal policies and increased immigration. He patronizes Romney's explanation of a child allowance as a room to boost fertility, but he doesn't like Biden's family programs.

Stone experiences Democrats' universal childcare and paid leave programs as "transparently discriminatory" towards socially republican and religious class, many of whom want to stay home with their teenagers and don't like the relevant recommendations of government-run daycares or academies. He argues that the debate over lineage program evaporates down to a "culture war" over "public evaluates , standards, " and "what a socially-approved lifestyle looks like."

"We all know that minors who grow up with a parent at home are more likely to grow up and become Republican. It's this simple, " he said. "They're more likely to be religious, they're more likely to do all these things that are just very highly partisan coded. And so one feature wants to get all the children in daycare and one back doesn't."

He added, "We live in a tribal civilization where everybody's just thinking about how these policies suffice their tribe."

But there is some convergence between progressives and younger social reactionaries on economically populist pro-family policy. Stone argues that both traditional conservatives and liberals have designed their family policy to promote work, rather than to do what's best for kinfolks. He reinforces a government-funded childcare program that they are able to offer stay-at-home parents -- which some progressives likewise back -- so as not to incentivize working outside the home.

"These aren't programs for lineages, such is curricula for boss, " Stone sad. "These are platforms designed to increase labor-force participation and supply a more easily adjusted labor market that have just been rebranded as household policies."

GOP lawmakers and other conservatives has begun to stringing up against Biden's "human infrastructure" proposals. Reacting to Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand's tweet calling paid leave, childcare, and caregiving "infrastructure, " Donald Trump Jr. wrote, "I don't think any of those things are infrastructure, but you know what is ??? THE WALL."

Read the original section on Business Insider

Read more: feedproxy.google.com

30Apr/210

Biden is betting big with plans to remake America. Here are 6 takeaways from Biden’s speech.

U.S. President Joe Biden addresses a joint session of Congress as Vice President Kamala Harris (L) and Speaker of the House U.S. Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (R) look on in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol. U.S. President Joe Biden addresses a joint seminar of Congress as Vice President Kamala Harris( L) and Speaker of the House U.S. Rep. Nancy Pelosi( D-CA)( R) look upon in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol.

President Joe Biden delivered his first discussion to a seam conference of Congress on Wednesday night. Biden called for an bold pandemic economic recovery plan focused on places, infrastructure, and childcare. He also called for changes to immigration and foreign policy and queried the Senate to pass civil rights legislation. See more narratives on Insider's business page.

President Joe Biden delivered his first pronunciation to a seam session of Congress on Wednesday night, on the eve of his 100 th day in office.

In his address before a pared-down audience due to the pandemic, Biden called for an grandiose economic recovery plan focused on professions, infrastructure, childcare, and education. The proposals are some of the most progressive in decades - and ones unlikely to garner Republican support, as evidenced by GOP reactions in appeals chamber and on Twitter .

Democrats support the House but their majority in the Senate comes down to Vice President Kamala Harris' tie-breaking vote. The GOP is unlikely to pass legislation that contributes to the deficit - but too is no longer able are ready to undo former President Donald Trump's 2017 duty slashes in order to pay for broader government spending.

But tonight, those looming legislative battles were in the background as Biden unveiled his expansive plans.

In his speech, Biden likewise called for changes to immigration and foreign policy and queried the Senate to pass signature civil right legislation - including police reform and voting rights legislation.

Here are the biggest takeaways from the speech.

Biden is betting big-hearted with major spending plans

Biden detailed an daring $ 4 trillion spending curriculum focused on overhauling the American economy and recasting the role of government to better secure the welfare of families. A enormous part of the address was spent on the economy and its recovery from the pandemic.

He's fresh off the passing of a $ 1.9 trillion stimulus principle in March, a measure broadly favourite with American voters in part due to the $ 1,400 direct payments. He touted the federal checks and said the law contributed to a fall in hunger.

Biden swiftly swiveled to his latest pair of economic proposals, one to upgrade physical infrastructure and the other meant to level the playing field for midriff and low-income kinfolks. The latest is a $ 1.8 trillion economic container unveiled Wednesday aimed at setting up sweeping brand-new federal programs in education, childcare, and healthcare.

Key measures include universal pre-K, tuition-free community college, a federal paid leave program, and an extension of currency pays for parents under the revamped child tax credit.

"These are the investments we fix together, as one country, and that merely government can procreate, " Biden said. "Time and again, they propel us into the future."

Biden redoubled down on his promise not to raise taxes for Americans earning under $400,000 a year. Instead, he requires large firms and the rich to bear the brunt of levy increases. "It's term for corporate America and the wealthiest 1% of Americans to pay their fair share, " he said.

Biden is following in the steps of his Democratic predecessor, Barack Obama, with his duty assurance. In 2008, Obama said he would spare families seeing below $250,000 from levy hikes.

Republicans are very unlikely to support the newest "American Families Plan" proposal. "There are individual components that conservatives might be more encouraging, but the full$ 2 trillion bundle, financed under large-hearted new taxes, is absolutely a non-starter for Republicans, " Brian Riedl, a plan professional at the right-leaning Manhattan Institute, said.

The president likewise misses Congress to move on healthcare reform and parent the minimum wage

Biden implored Congress to raise the federal minimum wage, which hasn't budged from $7.25 an hour since 2009. "No one should work 40 hours a few weeks and still live below the poverty line, " he said.

Democrats are supportive of raising the minimum wages but sharply disagree on the amount. Some like Sen. Bernie Sanders are propagandizing $15 an hour minimum wage, though others like Sen. Joe Manchin back a lower level like $11 an hour. It's unclear whether Democrats will be successful in lifting hourly wages, made it is very likely to have to be a bill that lures GOP votes.

Biden too called lawmakers to step in and lower prescription drug overheads, an initiative reportedly scrapped from his second financial packet. "Let's do what we've always has spoken about, " the president said. "Let's give Medicare the power to save hundreds of billions of dollars by negotiating lower prices for prescription drugs. "

He's proposed providing health insurance subsidies for the Affordable Care Act as part of his spend planneds. He spurned pres from progressives to lower the Medicare eligibility age, though he pledged to do so in his campaign.

He also hurled his support behind the PRO Act, a greenback to make it easier for laborers to unionize. That has stalled in the Senate, unable to cross the 60 -vote threshold known as the filibuster.

Biden talks in-migration - but not the border

Biden likewise again announced on Congress to pass comprehensive migration reform, stressing the need to provide a pathway to law status for millions of undocumented beings in the United Regime - stressing that this was a bipartisan goal.

"Let's death our drain combat over in-migration, " he said. "For more than 30 years, politicians has spoken about in-migration reform and done nothing about it. It's time to fix it."

The day he took office, Biden unveiled a proposal that would grant permanent residency to countless migrant farm workers and citizenship for those who came to the US as children. On Wednesday, Biden said Congress should work to offset those specific provisions statute right off, acknowledging certain difficulties of overtaking more robust reform in a 50 -5 0 Senate.

"Congress needs to pass legislation this year to finally secure protection for the Dreamers - the young people who have only known America as their home, " he said. He too called for legislation to grant "permanent armours for immigrants on temporary protected status" and a process for concede citizenship to "farmworkers who kept menu on our tables."

Biden did not, however, speak to the current status of US margins, which remain shuttered to all but unaccompanied minors - a recent flow of whom overtaken governments, who have since scrambled to convert inns and meeting centers into holding equipment. The Biden administration continues to expel other asylum-seekers absconding privation and cruelty in the Americas, citing the pandemic and the need to rebuild a processing system devastated by the last White House.

Biden laid out a foreign policy plan that differs from the Trump doctrine

During his address, Biden's focus on foreign policy centered mainly around strengthening the US' tie-in with friends and forging working but stern relations with Russia and China.

Biden said that in approaching foreign policy, his government would operate on the mind that, "America is the most unique idea in history."

In a distinguish to Trump, Biden immediately accused Russia for interference in the 2016 referendums as well as the recent SolarWinds cyberattacks which infraction governments private business systems.

The President added that in conversations with his Russian counterpart, he has "made clear, " to Vladimir Putin that the US will not seek escalation, but Russia's, "actions will have consequences." Biden added that the US and Russian should cooperate when interests are aligned.

Biden added that "hes having" held hours-long conversations with Chinese President Xi Jinping and put forth a similar offset. The President also singled out Iran and North Korea's nuclear power plants, describing them as menaces, but committed to working with allies and both nations through "diplomacy and stern deterrence."

He also spoke about his promise to end the "forever war in Afghanistan, " acknowledging and vindicating the US' long footprint in "the two countries ". Saying that the US fulfilled their promise to bring Osama Bin Laden to the "gates of blaze, " and that soldiers are serving in "the same war zone as their parents, " he said it's time to bring armies dwelling.

Biden addressed gun control policy and advised congressional action against shoot cruelty in the US

During his address to Congress, the president called gun cruelty an "epidemic in America, " mentioning how the flag at the White House fly half-staff to mourn the living standards lost at the Atlanta-area shootings and mass shooting in Colorado.

"In the week between those mass shootings, more than 250 other Americans were shot dead. 250 were dead, " Biden said.

He boasted his executive wars on grease-guns following those misfortunes but called for the Senate to act.

Biden called upon Senate Republicans to join Democratic members of Congress to "close openings and require background checks to purchase a gun" - such as the "boyfriend" loophole, which refers to a spread in grease-gun legislation that allows collaborators imprisoned of domestic violence to purchase a firearm if their partner was not a spouse, didn't have children with them, or lives with them at any point."

"I will do everything in my strength to protect the American people from this epidemic of grease-gun brutality, " he said. "But it's hour for Congress to act as well."

The president called on the Senate to pass two portions of civil rights legislation

Biden remembered cros Gianna Floyd, the daughter of George Floyd, during her father's funeral last year, saying how she was right in saying her father "changed the world" in light of the guilty finding of ex-Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in Floyd's killing.

While he recognized that "most men and women in uniform wear their button and dish their communities honorably, " the president insisted Americans to come together to "rebuild trust between law enforcement and the people they serve" and "root out systemic racism in our criminal justice system."

He exhorted lawmakers to pass the police reform bill appointed after Floyd by the first anniversary of Floyd's extinction on May 25.

The president too cajoled the Senate to pass the John R. Lewis Voting Rights Act, which has already passed in the House.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Read more: feedproxy.google.com

12Apr/210

Stimulus checks are starting to hit Americans’ bank accounts this weekend, but some may not be able to access the money right away

Angry man arguing during conference call on laptop Some Americans may not be able to access their federal cash this weekend.

Many Americans are seeing $ 1,400 stimulus checks in their bank account, but they may not be able to access the money immediately. The IRS said it is officially releasing the payments on March 17. That means it may take various more epoches for the checks to clear at major international financial institutions. See more stories on Insider's business page.

Many Americans are seeing $ 1,400 stimulus checks hit their bank account this weekend under President Joe Biden's stimulus statute. But parties may not be able to immediately tap into it - at least , not until St. Patrick's Day at the earliest.

The direct payments, which the IRS labeled as "Economic Impact Payments, " are set to be paid out on March 17, per the agency.

"As with the first two Economic Impact Payments in 2020, most Americans will receive their coin without having to take any action, " the IRS said on its website. "Some Americans may experience the direct money remittances as pending or as provisional fees in their histories before the official payment date of March 17. "

That intends it could take several more dates for the relief checks to clear at major banks like Wells Fargo. Others such as Chase said on their website it expected to release the payouts March 17 and after.

-Wells Fargo (@ WellsFargo) March 12, 2021

"Wells Fargo will process all of the direct situates according to the effective date provided by the U.S. Treasury, " the bank said in countless follow-up tweets to patrons frustrated with the delay .

Some digital banks, like Chime, however, suggest that they sanctioned clients to instantaneously access their federal currency. On Friday, they issued a "stimmy alert" on Twitter saying the service had already distributed $600 million.

-Chime (@ Chime) March 12, 2021

Chime did not immediately respond to a request for comment on their decision.

The IRS just said Friday that people can begin tracking the status of their checks squandering the "Get my Payment" portal on Monday. The enterprise also said it expects to issue more direct deposits and transmit payments as a check or debit card over the coming weeks.

Singles deserving up to $ 75,000 in adjusted gross income qualify for the full amount, together with duos making up to $ 150,000. Each adult dependent is eligible for a check as well.

However, the stimulus remittances phase out much more quickly. Types earning above $80,000 and pairs making above $ 160,000 will not receive anything.

Read the original commodity on Business Insider

Read more: feedproxy.google.com

14Mar/210

10 FAQs About the $3,000 Stimulus Child Tax Credits

The $1.9 trillion stimulus bill approved by the House of Representatives on Wednesday contains good news for parents: In addition to getting $1,400 stimulus checks for each dependent child, most parents will qualify for extra child tax credit money for children 17 and younger.

10 FAQs About the Expanded Child Tax Credit

The American Relief Plan makes the current $2,000 child tax credit more generous for most parents. Families can receive up to $3,600 for each child under 6 and up to $3,000 for each child ages 6 to 17. President Joe Biden plans to sign the bill into law on Friday, March 12. We’ll update this post as we get more information.

1. Who qualifies for the expanded child tax credit?

Single parents making less than $75,000 a year, heads of household earning $112,500 and married couples earning less than $150,000 would qualify for:

$3,000 ($1,000 extra) for each child between the ages of 6 and 17.
$3,600 ($1,600 extra) for each child younger than 6.

The extra $1,000 or $1,600 would phase out at the same rate as the first stimulus check and second stimulus check: For every $1 you make above the income limits, the additional credit is reduced by 5 cents until it disappears completely.

2. Have the rules changed for people making over these amounts who normally qualify for the $2,000 tax credit?

No. If you make above the limits for the expanded credit, you can still qualify for the regular $2,000 child credit. Parents who are single receive the full $2,000 per child if their income is less than $200,000. Parents who are married receive the full $2,000 per child if their combined income is less than $400,000. For incomes above these limits, the credit gradually phases out.

3. When will we receive the payments?

Half of the credits will be sent out in monthly installments between July and December. Parents would receive the remaining half as a tax refund when they file their 2021 tax returns next year.

So a family that qualifies for the $3,000 credit with one 7-year-old would receive $250 monthly payments from July through December, and then get the remaining credit as a tax refund in 2022.

4. What tax returns are the payments based on?

Because payments won’t begin until July, they’ll be based on your 2020 tax return. Technically, though, they’re an advance on a tax credit for 2021.

The stimulus checks worked exactly the same way. The first two checks were an advance on a 2020 tax credit that were based primarily on 2019 income. The third check is an advance on a 2021 tax credit that will be based on your 2020 or 2019 return, depending on whether you’ve filed.

5. Who gets the credit if the parents are divorced or don’t live together?

The parent who claims the child on their 2020 tax return will receive the credit. However, for parents who take turns claiming a child on their tax returns, it’s unclear how this would work.

For stimulus checks, if Parent A claimed a child on their 2019 tax return, they received $1,100 worth of stimulus money during 2020 on the child’s behalf. If Parent B claimed the child for 2020, they’ll receive $1,100 as a tax refund.

FROM THE TAXES FORUM

W4/withholding Changes
3/11/21 @ 2:08 PM

KellyFromKeene

How long do you keep paper records?
3/1/20 @ 4:42 AM

Jobelle Collie

paying taxes and social security taxes
3/1/21 @ 7:09 PM

Tammeylupie

See more in Taxes or ask a money question

6. Would babies born in 2021 qualify?

Yes, but their parents most likely would not receive monthly payments for July through December because the IRS won’t have any record of the child. Instead, parents would need to file a 2021 tax return next year and get the entire $3,600 as a refund.

7. Will I have to pay back the credit if I’m eligible for less based on my 2021 taxes?

Possibly. Singles with an income below $40,000, heads of household with an income below $50,000 and married couples earning $60,000 or less would be exempt from repaying any overpayment.

However, single filers earning more than $80,000, heads of households earning $100,000 and married couples earning $120,000 would have to repay the entire overpayment with their 2021 taxes.

8. Are 17-year-olds included?

Yes. The bill increases the age limit for child tax credits from 16 to 17.

9. Do you need earned income to get the credit as a refund?

No. Under the normal rules, only $1,400 of the $2,000 child credit is refundable, meaning you can receive up to $1,400 as a refund. To get that refund, you need at least $2,500 of earned income.

However, the temporary rules allow the entire credit of $3,000 (or $3,600 for kids under 6) to be refundable. You won’t need earned income to receive the refund.

10. Are these changes permanent?

No. While some Democrats are pushing to make these changes permanent, as things currently stand, they’ll only apply in 2021.

Robin Hartill is a certified financial planner and a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. She writes the Dear Penny personal finance advice column. Send your tricky money questions to AskPenny@thepennyhoarder.com.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

Read more: autocreditsoftware.com